Predictors for self-reported feeling of depression three months after stroke: A longitudinal cohort study

Authors

  • Janina Kaarre
  • Tamar Abzhandadze
  • Katharina S. Sunnerhagen

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.2340/16501977-2816

Keywords:

stroke, cognition, assessment, depression, self-perceived, prediction, bootstrapping

Abstract

Objective: Depression and impaired cognition are common consequences of stroke. The aim of this study was to determine whether cognitive impairment 36?48 h post-stroke could predict self-reported feeling of depression 3 months post-stroke. Design: A longitudinal, cohort study. Patients: Patients aged ??18 years at stroke onset. Methods: Cognition was screened using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, 36?48 h after admission to the stroke unit at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. Information about self-reported feeling of depression 3 months post-stroke was retrieved from Riksstroke (the national quality register for stroke in Sweden). Bootstrapped binary logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: Of 305 patients, 42% were female, median age was 70 years, and 65% had mild stroke. Three months post-stroke, 56% of patients had self-reported feeling of depression; of these, 65% were female. Impaired cognition at baseline could not predict self-reported feeling of depression 3 months later. The odds for self-reported feeling of depression were twice as high in female patients (odds ratio 2.01; 95% confidence interval, 0.20?1.22; p?<?0.01). Conclusion: Impaired cognition early after stroke could not predict self-reported feeling of depression 3 months post-stroke. Compared with male patients, female patients had twice the odds of self-reported feeling of depression

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Published

2021-03-25

How to Cite

Kaarre, J., Abzhandadze, T., & S. Sunnerhagen, K. (2021). Predictors for self-reported feeling of depression three months after stroke: A longitudinal cohort study. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 53(3 (March), 1–7. https://doi.org/10.2340/16501977-2816

Issue

Section

Original Report